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Partner Spotlight: Brooks Contractor

Brooks Contractor   A truck picking up some binsRows of compostA machine turning a row of compost

Popular questions we get are how and where do we compost all of these wonderful food scraps we pick up every week. As it happens, we don't do it alone!

CompostNow partners with Brooks Contractor to form the perfect composting team. CompostNow handles the door-to-door pickup at households throughout the Triangle, and we bring it all to our central locations. Brooks Contractor, who already collects from major sites throughout the area, then come and collect from us with their large capacity trucks. From there, they haul your collected food scraps and other compostable materials to their existing composting facility.

Located in Goldston, NC (about an hour southwest of the Triangle), the Brooks Compost Facility recycles over 65,000 tons of organic materials per year (that's heavier than the Titanic1). This material was landfilled in the past and is now turned into a usable product that beautifies the plant life in our communities.

What started as an experimental trial in 1999, Brooks Contractor's commercial food waste recycling program has grown into a model system for other areas of the country. They now service nearly 140 locations in Chatham, Cumberland, Durham, Guilford, Orange, and Wake counties.

Family owned and operated and heavily engaged in the composting community, Brooks Contractor takes great care in producing high quality compost. Their soil mixes contain no harmful chemicals or biosolids, resulting in a purely organic material that is safe to use in any type of environment. 

Complementing Brooks Contractor's many community endeavors, CompostNow helps further complete the urban food cycle by returning the rich soil to our members, as well as sending it to our many garden partners as elected by each member.


Brooks Compost facts: 


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The RMS Titanic had a displacement of 52,310 tons.